Learn about the early decisions and mistakes of Yahoo, and how they affected not only its outcome but also the internet giants of today.

 

About the Book

We Were Yahoo!: From Internet Pioneer to the Trillion Dollar Loss of Google and Facebook

Lots of questions have been asked and will continue to be asked how Yahoo, one of the great brands in corporate history, could in only twenty-two years rise to some of the greatest heights ever seen in American business and then fall into oblivion.

The story of Yahoo is fascinating due to the sheer scale of its missteps and how the results of those missteps helped to define the world the global population lives in today. It’s a story of some of the largest mistakes in the history of business and a must-read for business students and entrepreneurs on how each decision has a cascading effect for future performance.

 

Upcoming Events

Dates to be announced soon

About Jeremy Ring

Author Jeremy Ring photo

Only someone from the corporate inside could explain how Yahoo! could rise to the greatest height ever seen in American business…and then crash into oblivion. 

Senator Jeremy Ring was an early Internet pioneer, having opened the east coast office for Yahoo in early 1996. Following five extremely successful years with the company, Senator Ring relocated with his young family to Florida. Bloomberg Business Week named Ring as one of the top ten Yahoo alumni in America.

In 2006, Ring overwhelmingly was elected to Florida State Senate. During his ten years in office, Senator Ring introduced and passed several pieces of legislation aimed at jump-starting the innovation economy for the state.

Q & A

Q: What made you write this book?

A: I had written an early draft in 2011. I had back-to-back open heart surgeries and it was therapeutic to write to help me recover. The book was put on hold as I moved into different phases of life, but in 2016 when Yahoo's Board Of Directors announced it would open a bid process to sell the company’s assets, I felt it was important to finish. At that point, I realized I had written a draft of the rise of Yahoo and knew I had to write the second half of the book, the fall of Yahoo.


Q: Why was now the right timing to tell the story of Yahoo's rise and fall?

A: The timing was perfect because the company, which was once such a leader, had announced it was selling the assets of Yahoo.com and it would be a very newsworthy topic.  I felt it was a story that needed to be told by someone who had been there.  


Q: What has been the response from other Yahoo alumni?

A: From the few I shared with there was sadness because we all had such a rooting interest in its success and we were all disheartened by all the missed opportunities.


Q: Any you think need to be careful not to take the same mis-steps?

A: Uber, If they aren't careful, their arrogance could destroy the company. They have recognized this and have moved to make changes at the CEO level. Uber has been very antagonistic toward government and government will always win. Plus they continue to innovate, and they aren't sitting on their hands.


Q: Who were your early influencers on politics, authorship and being an entrepreneur?

A: My earliest influencers were Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak from Apple, George Lucas, John Lasseter from Pixar, Elon Musk, Marc Andreesen and other innovators who changed the world with their ideas


Q: From Yahoo to government, how did your experience at Yahoo help with that journey?

 

A: Yahoo was a huge influence in my political career. Much of the legislation I authored dealt with creating an innovation economy in Florida to match Silicon Valley. I created incubators, early stage venture capital funds and late stage growth capital funds to provide ideas and capital for the Florida start-up technology companies. I also used my Yahoo experience to drive innovation in the classroom. I still believe that all high school students in America should be required to take a computer coding class.


Q: What is next for Jeremy Ring?

A: I still have strong political aspirations and would like my next book to be about individuals who through innovation have changed the world but we don't know much about them, yet.